DAGGER Student Team (former)

Josh Feierstein

Josh worked extensively on this project from the data management angle, working to incorporate gigabites of data we've collected over the past four years into a useable web interface.  His work is the Data Portal part of this website.

Click here to see examples of his work.

(Geo-Technology Associates, Inc., B.S. 2015, Appalachian State University)

L. McCain Moore

McCain spent a significant amount of time in the XRD lab working to determine the mineralogy of the Late Devonian Heishantou Formation in northwestern China.

Click here to see examples of her work.

(Terracon; B.S. 2015, Appalachian State University) 

Sonia Sanchez

Sonia has been instrumental in making a detailed characterization of the Late Devonian Zhulumute Formation in northwestern China.

(M.S. in progress, University of Cincinnati; B.S. 2014, Appalachian State University)

Aubry DeReuil

Aubry's undergraduate senior thesis "Sedimentation, Geochemistry, and Mineralogy across the Frasnian-Fammenian Boundary, northwestern China" was an important contribution to one of the primary DAGGER projects. Aubry recognized that the size distribution of framboidal pyrite can be used to determine the extent and severity of ocean anoxia in sediments that are not black shales.  Aubry is currently at the University of Utah working on an M.S. and Ph.D. in Sedimentology.

Click here to see examples of her work.

Casey Weber

Casey did preliminary work to determine the feasibility of using FT-IR to detect organic compounds preserved in Asian sediments that record the Kellwasser and Hangenberg Events.

Iris Ferris

Iris worked extensively on characterizing Mongolian sediments with X-ray diffraction.

(B.S. in progress, Appalachian State University)

Matthew Wilson

Matthew characterized the sedimentology surrounding the the Late Devonian annulata Event in Chinese sediments.

(Ph.D. in progress, VA Tech; B.S. 2016, Appalachian State University)

Cameron Batchelor

Cameron is (still) working on a geochemical study of the Late Devonian mass extinction, using 87Sr/86Sr measurements to provide information about depositional setting and diagenesis, and looking for zircons in sediments and lava flows to help constrain biostratigraphic ages. When she is not on the scanning electron microscope at Appalachian, she is working in the Geochronology and Isotope Geochemistry lab run by Dr. Drew Coleman at UNC-Chapel Hill.

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