Student Work

Undergraduate students are an integral part of the work done for the DAGGER project.  Here are some examples of student work associated with this project.

Allison Dombrowski '20

Allison worked with the DAGGER team for three years while she was at Appalachian. Much of her work during her early years was in the background, assisting with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Sr isotope lab work on a variety of projects - from Vietnam to Belgium to China. Her senior thesis work in Mongolia was presented at the AGU Fall Meeting in 2019, and she is a co-author on our work in Vietnam on the D-C boundary:

*Paschall, Olivia C., Carmichael, Sarah K., Waters, Johnny A., Koenigshof, Peter, Ta, Phuong H. Komatsu, Toshifumi, and *Dombrowski, Allison D., 2019, The Hangenberg Event in Vietnam: sustained ocean anoxia with a volcanic trigger?, Global and Planetary Change (Special issue on Devonian global changes - recent advances and challenges in different domains, eds. G. Racki and P. Wignall), v. 175, p. 64-81 (DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2019.01.021) - click here for institutional repository copy with supplemental data

She is a co-author on several additional conference presentations and will be a co-author on a series of upcoming publications in Palaeobiodiversity and Palaoenvironments for her work in Mongolia.

Olivia Paschall '18

Olivia's pioneering work on the geochemistry of the Pho Han Formation in Vietnam has resulted in a paper that is one of the first to correlate massive volcanism with the Hangenberg Crisis.  Olivia has also contributed to the group's work in Mongolia through field mapping and digital elevation models (see her Explorers Club report for details).  Her contributions include (so far) the following peer reviewed publications and several associated conference presentations at AGU and GSA:

*Paschall, Olivia C., Carmichael, Sarah K., Waters, Johnny A., Koenigshof, Peter, Ta, Phuong H. Komatsu, Toshifumi, and *Dombrowski, Allison D., 2019, The Hangenberg Event in Vietnam: sustained ocean anoxia with a volcanic trigger?, Global and Planetary Change (Special issue on Devonian global changes - recent advances and challenges in different domains, eds. G. Racki and P. Wignall), v. 175, p. 64-81 (DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2019.01.021) - click here for institutional repository copy with supplemental data

She is a co-author on several additional conference presentations and will be a co-author on an upcoming publication in Palaeobiodiversity and Palaoenvironments for her work in Mongolia.

Cameron Batchelor '15

Cameron has worked for three years on several aspects of the DAGGER project, and made herself an invaluable team member for her work each summer (and fall break, and spring break, and winter break) in the Isotope Geochemisty Lab at UNC Chapel Hill.  Her work spans Sr isotope chemostratigraphy in western China to radiometric dating of zircons from Mongolia (see her Explorers Club report for details).  Her contributions include two peer reviewed papers (so far) as well as several conference presentations:

Carmichael, S.K., Waters, J.A., *Batchelor, C.J., Coleman, D., Suttner, T.J., Kido, E., *Moore, L.M., and Chadimova, L., 2016, Climate instability and tipping points in the Late Devonian: Detection of the Hangenberg Event in an open oceanic island arc in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, Gondwana Research v. 32, p. 213-231 (doi:10.1016/j.gr.2015.02.009).

Suttner, Thomas J., Kido, Erika, Ariunchimeg, Yarinpil, Sersmaa, Gonchigdorj, Waters, Johnny A., Carmichael, Sarah K., *Batchelor, Cameron J., *Ariuntogos, Munkhjargal, *Hušková, Aneta, Slavik, Ladislav, Valenzuela-Ríos, José I., Liao, Jau-Chyn, and Gatovsky, Yury A., 2019, Conodonts from Late Devonian island arc settings (Baruunhuurai Terrane, western Mongolia), Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (DOI: 10.1016/j.palaeo.2019.03.001)

Cameron is currently working on her PhD in isotope geochemistry at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. 

Joshua Feierstein '15

Josh worked tirelessly in 2014-2015 to migrate our extensive data set from a complicated and not-user-friendly database system to an easy-to-navigate web-based SQL system for our collaborators (accounts are provided by contacting Dr. Sarah Carmichael).  The http://dagger.appstate.edu site is his creation (shown below).

DAGGER data portal screenshot

Josh is now a PG (licensed professional geologist) who has recently started his own geosciences consulting company, Natural Geodata, LLC.

Aubry Dereuil '13

Aubry was the first student to work on the DAGGER project back in 2011.  Her project dramatically morphed from a relatively straightforward isotope and carbonate geochemistry project into the search for anoxia at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary.  Her important contributions about pyrite framboids and the sedimentology of the lower part of the Boulongour Reservoir section in northwestern China include a paper in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (cited 57 times so far):

Carmichael, Sarah K., Waters, Johnny A., Suttner, Thomas J., Kido, Erika, and DeReuil, Aubry, 2014, A New Model for the Kellwasser Anoxia Events (Late Devonian): Shallow Water Anoxia in an Open Oceanic Setting in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 399, p. 394-403

She is a co-author on numerous other conference presentations as well.  Aubry has recently finished her PhD in Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah. 

L. McCain Moore '15

McCain spent a significant part of her summer in the XRD lab working on sediments spanning the Heishantou Formation in China. Her contributions to the DAGGER group include one peer reviewed paper and one conference presentation (and she is a co-author on numerous additional conference presentations):

Carmichael, S.K., Waters, J.A., Batchelor, C.J., Coleman, D., Suttner, T.J., Kido, E., Moore, L.M., and Chadimova, L., 2015, Climate instability and tipping points in the Late Devonian: Detection of the Hangenberg Event in an open oceanic island arc in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, Gondwana Research (doi:10.1016/j.gr.2015.02.009). 

McCain recently finished her MS in Geology at Queens College in New York, and is now working as a geologist in Charleston, SC.